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Archive for the ‘governance’ Category

Attitude that we will do all the innovations ourselves needs to change!!

20 Nov

By Nitesh Naveen, Co-founder & CEO – Unicom Seminars India
20 Nov 2015


Innovation has been a buzz word ever since it was coined. Innovation can be viewed as the application of better solutions that meet new requirements, inarticulated needs, or existing market needs. This is accomplished through more effective products, processes, services, technologies, or ideas that are readily available to markets, governments and society. The term innovation can be defined as something original and, as a consequence, new, that “breaks into” the market or society.

UNICOM Seminars brought in Innovation by developing a team and process that enabled us to build a capability of getting “U” number of people (we think ‘X’ has been overdone with and love the Letter “U” as it is all about you and Unicom) under one roof on any particular day at 10% of the existing cost. “U” depends on the objective (Why, when, etc.) and $$$$$ in hand. 🙂

We realised that we can do multiple businesses with this capability. We chose IT industry as our first home because we knew it better. We decided to run Knowledge share Summits, Trainings and Showcase events as our initial ‘Value to Market’ strategy. So from what started as building an Unfair Advantage (reference: Lean Start Up) has now resulted in defining UNICOM as B2B2C platform in the area of knowledge share and customer reach for IT Industry.

We now work closely with Marketing department of few IT companies (product, services and consulting) and help them to reach out to their customers. We also work closely with L&D teams helping them to develop future thought leaders of the world. We are building communities of highly passionate professionals about whom you will read or hear in months to come. We have still not reached the million dollar mark, but have created a platform that can help us cross it next year.

In 2014, we experimented and found success in getting the “U” in 9 countries across 5 product lines. We chose to silently build this capability, sensing that we need to keep a low profile till we raise the entry barrier in our highly lucrative business, a lip smacking $100bn industry. This innovation in Marketing was possible because the corporate Marketing team was open to use innovations outside their company. The usual chase to reach the target keeps them focussed and they were culturally open to absorb innovations thanks to the cut throat competition in their function.

In all the 9 countries where we ran events – India, USA, UK, Singapore, South Africa, Malaysia, Sri Lanka, Switzerland and Netherlands – we noticed that innovations are now largely carried out by smaller companies esp. in the start-up phase. This was hardly surprising. However what was surprising to see was very few Big companies were involving those ‘outside their office” innovations in their innovation basket. I spoke to few CIOs/CTOs of IT Product and Services team and realised that they want their employees to do those innovations themselves, file for the patent themselves or consider their innovation plan to be superior than ‘others’. Good thing was that they were talking about innovation. Bad thing was that they were having little idea about the ground realities, thanks to their companies who have allowed only their sales team to talk to their customers. Worse thing was that they think they completely know what their customer wants and what their competitors are doing, little realising that their competitor’s face is changing faster than they think.
India’s celebrated Retail king and promoter of Big Bazaar retail chain, Mr Kishore Biyani, used to compete with RPG, Reliance, Tatas and Birlas of the world and had a team of strategists working out ways to tackle international retail biggies. He is now competing with year old start-ups who are using technology to change the buyer’s behaviour. In Australia, the likes of Coles and Myers are going through similar phase. This story is similar in most of the countries where we entered in 2014. Companies that had ears and eyes close to the ground, like Target and Walmart adopted the market ready innovations provided by start-ups and are looking competitive enough to face the next disruption in retail.

 

Biggest adopter of ‘Ready to Market’ Innovation is Healthcare sector. This was surprising to me as it is also the most regulated industry. However their evolution is a case study for other industries to imbibe.

 

One of the industries I find to be vulnerable is Indian IT Services Industry. They are competing on cost as revealed by Mr Vishal Sikka, CEO of Infosys (was that a revelation??) and in my opinion are trying to rely on their execution capability to replicate an innovation done by others. While being a fast second mover is a good and safe bet for IT Services companies, it can sometimes be too late when business brings a disruptive competitor/technology/change. Would it not work to the best of their advantage to promote strategic Tech start-ups by inviting them to work closely with their innovation team, helping them to grow and thereby provide more and better service to their client base? While IT services in India are working with few start-ups, won’t they be real leaders (like their US counterparts) when they adopt at least 100 start-ups each aligning to their business profile. Do they have money to do this? I think they have plenty. Do they have vision to do this? I hope they do have.


Just imagine how our world would change if each of the top 5 IT services company in India (TCS, CTS, Infosys, Wipro & Tech Mahindra) adopts atleast 100 tech start-up each. Now tell me why they are not doing? Can’t we show the world that we can take initiative in not only adopting villages & toilets but also start-ups?

 

The Internet of Things: Coming to a Network Near You

17 May
When people talk about the Internet of Things (IoT), the most common examples are smart cars, IP-addressable washing machines and Internet-connected refrigerators. But IoT is coming to the enterprise as well, and CIOs should already be thinking about the ways it will shake up the corporate network.“Products and services which were previously outside their (CIOs’) domain will increasingly be under their jurisdiction,” says Daniel Castro, senior analyst with the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF), a US-based research and educational institute.

So, what are these devices?

Castro says that companies increasingly will be operating in “smart buildings” with advanced HVAC systems that are connected to the rest of the corporate network.

Many utility companies will be deploying Web-connected smart meters at customers’ facilities to allow for remote monitoring.

Companies are tying their physical security to their network security, so that data from security cameras and authentication readers are coming under the purview of enterprise IT. Most of the retailers already use RFID and other tracking technologies to manage supply chain logistics, says IDC’s Michael Fauscette. IoT is therefore a natural next step.

Then there’s operational technology (OT), where enterprise assets such as manufacturing equipment, fleet trucks, rail cars, even patient monitoring equipment in hospitals become networked devices, says Hung LeHong, research vice president at Gartner.

“Those types of assets are becoming Internet-enabled,” LeHong says. And even though they are managed by field operations or hospital services, they could become end-points on the corporate network.

Other examples of OT might include companies deploying vending machines that are connected to the Internet, so that they can be automatically restocked when certain items run low.

Another key area where IoT is making an appearance is what Gartner calls the digital supply chain. That’s when a company’s end-products, such as consumer electronics or large machinery, are Internet-enabled so that the manufacturer can keep track of maintenance schedules and other such aspects.
Besides, IoT is also showing up in consumer offerings such as home automation and smart grid. IT executives in industries such as gas and electric utilities will need to stay abreast of developments such as how smart meters and other types of data-generating solutions will affect IT and the corporate network.

And finally, IoT is emerging in so-called smart cities, where all kinds of devices and assets such as traffic lights, parking meters and garbage truck fleets are gradually being connected to the Internet. Municipal government IT executives will need to be aware of how these assets tie in to the network.

IT and OT Convergence

What will likely happen is a convergence of OT and IT. “As these machines go onto the corporate network, CIOs need to start talking together about what the future will look like when traditional IT and OT overlap on the network,” LeHong says.

“Who is responsible for providing security, for example,” LeHong asks. “There are existing IT skill sets that are very developed, but are at the same time, new or not a prime focus for the operations guy. There can be some synergies.”

IT executives will need to prepare themselves for situations such as when an IP-based vending machine is creating software replenishment orders for out-of-stock items using an ERP application, he believes.

“When it creates the replenishment order, does the vending machine need a user license for the ERP application?” LeHong asks. “CIOs need to get an understanding of this. Even if they are not going to own the vending machines, they need to worry about things like these. That’s what we mean by convergence. OT and IT need to discuss things like governance, security, software licensing and maintenance.”

In terms of networking technology and strategies at enterprises, IoT will have a significant impact. According to a report on IoT trends published by Gartner in 2012, things will be connected, but not necessarily in the ways most familiar to companies today. “Wi-Fi, 3G/4G cellular and Bluetooth are the wireless connectivity technologies we are most familiar with. However, they will not be the only way things connect to the Internet,” the report says.

These network technologies and protocols consume lots of power and are designed for higher-bandwidth applications, the firm says, but many things (for example, a temperature/humidity sensor in a remote agricultural setting) will require low bandwidth, long range and very low power consumption.

Looking ahead to the next few years, growth of the IoT will probably be greatest in areas such as inventory tracking and supply chain management, says Castro from ITIF. But given the way technology is developing, it’s likely that the IoT will be pervasive in many aspects of business.

Source:  http://www.connectedenterprise.in/feature/internet-things-coming-network-near-you#front