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IoT Olympiad 2018

14 Feb

About IoT Olympiad 2018:
The 3rd edition of the annual corporate quiz contest IoT Olympiad is back!! Purpose of this contest is to identify India’s most knowledgeable Technology Manager. This year, we have revised the topics to make it a little more fun and competitive. Will you bring laurel to your organization and to yourself?

IoT Olympiad will be organized by UNICOM in 2018.

Over 1100 IT professionals from 300+ companies in India and abroad would be participating, with experience ranging from 5 years to 20 years.

Link:http://www.unicomlearning.com/iot-olympiad-2018.html

List of Topics that will be covered in IoT Olympiad 2018:

Embedded Software
Embedded C++
Embedded Hardware
IoT in Manufacturing
IoT in Retail/Ecommerce
IoT & Future of Connected Automobile
IoT & Smart Homes
IoT & Smart Cities
IoT in Energy/Utilities
IoT in Smart Buildings
IoT in Healthcare & Personal Fitness
IoT in Transportation, Supply Chain & Logistics

Game Plan:

Qualifier Round 1: Online, 07th March, 2018 – Duration 30 Mins [Time: 4:00-4:30 PM] FREE

A Team of 2 Persons needs to Register.
Link to take the quiz would be sent to nominees via email 2 days before the quiz
Quiz can be taken from anywhere – office / home / browsing centres, etc.
This round will be for 30 minutes. You will have to answer 40 Multiple Choice Questions
Questions have been designed to be generic covering all areas of IoT. Most delegates will find questions to be easy.
Based on performance selected teams will be qualified for Round 2.
Selected Candidates will be informed via Email & will have to pay a nominal fee of INR 15,000+ GST per team to participate in semi-finals. This fee includes Complimentary pass for IoT Summit 2018, Bangalore.

Semi-Finals in Bangalore at the conference venue (08:00 am to 08:30 am) PAY

Format – Pen and Paper based quiz.
This round will be for 40 minutes. You will have to answer 40 Multiple Choice Questions and 2 Situational and Subjective Questions
Top 04 teams will go to finals.
Certificates will be provided to all semi-finalists

Finals with 4 Teams in Bangalore at the conference venue (Time 4:30 PM to 5:00PM)

Quiz will have Audio and Video Rounds/Multiple Choice with Live scoring. Contest Format will be explained at the beginning.
This round will be for 40 minutes. You will have to answer 40 Multiple Choice Questions and 2 Situational and Subjective Questions
Result will be announced at the Venue by 5.30 PM. Winners and Runners-Up Teams will be given Prizes by our Chief Guest.

What’s the Best IoT Team taking home?

Winning Team – Gold Certificates and Gold Medal to both players in the team
First Runner Up Team – Silver Certificate and Silver Medal to both players in the team
Second Runner Up Team – Bronze Certificate and Bronze Medal to both players in the team
Winners shall be facilitated with the awards on the same day of conference in Bangalore at the World IoT Summit.

Who is eligible for IoT Olympiad’2018?

Anyone who is professionally involved in IoT Technology/Any Sector related to IoT Technology (at all roles) is eligible(Student/Fresher is not eligible)
Is there any participation fee?

There is no participation fee to take Qualifier Round.
Teams get selected for the Finals need to pay INR 15,000 + GST per team as participation fee. This fee includes Attendance @ Semi-Finals and Finals (selected teams).

How to Enrol for IoT Olympiad’2018?

Corporate & Non Corporate Nomination :

A Team* of two needs to enrol together by sending an email to contact@unicomlearning.com with following details of each participant:
Team Name | Full Name | Email Id | Phone Number | Company Name | Designation | Team name | Comments (If Any)
*More than one team can be nominated by a company

http://www.unicomlearning.com/iot-olympiad-2018.html

 
 

IoT – From Internet of Things to Innovation of things

01 Sep

Oracle adds new features to its IoT Cloud platform

Expanding its Internet of Things (IoT) Cloud portfolio, Oracle on Thursday rolled out ‘Digital Twin’ and ‘Digital Thread’ capabilities, powered by built-in artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning.

The new features will help customers gain operation-wide visibility and leverage predictive insights from connected assets which can increase deployment times, reduce costs and improve business outcomes.

“IoT holds the potential to transform today’s siloed operations into a modern, interconnected, digital set of workflows with real-time visibility and responsiveness,” said Bhagat Nainani, Group Vice President, IoT Applications, Oracle, in a statement.

“By receiving real-time data streams enhanced with predictive insights, they can reach new levels of intelligence and a much quicker realisation of return on investments,” Nainani added.

The company had recently introduced new industry solutions for digital field service, smart connected factories and digital fleet management.

Oracle IoT Cloud is offered both as software-as-a-service and platform-as-a-service, rendering the services adaptability for demanding implementations.

Conferences On IOT

IoT – From Internet of Things to Innovation of things

With the advent of IoT, the dream for a connected world seems not too far. IoT has been deemed as the next industrial revolution.The way in which the businesses, governments and the consumers interact with the world is undergoing a major change. This change is not small in nature but revolutionary in the kind of disruption it is going to bring about. This could definitely be the next industrial revolution.

According to a forecast, the IoT market is expected to grow from USD 157.05 Billion in 2016 to a whopping USD 661.74 billion by 2021, at a CAGR of 33.3% on a global scale. First of all we have to look at the advent of smart mobiles. That was the point which radically changed the way people used to connect with each other. Once people got connected the next step was to connect the products and the machines, and thus things were set in motion. The benefits that IoT will bring about will be in terms of operational cost which will be lowered along with the increase in productivity. It will also expand IT to new markets and create a new product offering. These basic factors have helped and given a momentum to IoT.

IOT summit

 
 

How IoT is shaping the future of healthcare

01 Sep

World IOT Bangalore

The connected way of things
A connected technology regime that spans manufacturing, distribution and end-use aids in monitoring plants, gives more control over quality, eliminates wastage and counterfeiting, and gives pharma companies more options on the compliance front. The whole framework relies on unhindered connectivity with sensors, devices storage and analysis platforms being bound together to permit data flow.

Though pharma companies can do much more with IoT, these are some of the areas where IoT can make a significant difference to their business.

Production
Pharma companies are observing that manufacturing costs for branded drugs can be nearly 30 percent of revenues, while, by comparison, R&D costs account for only 15 percent of revenues. Drug production flows are often complex depending on a series of variables. Production managers have to monitor more than 200 variables to ensure product and ingredient homogeneity across batches. Without the availability of detailed data, the process of figuring out a problem can turn into a time consuming and laborious affair.

The continuous unified flow of data from an IoT implementation allows for continuous process improvement, with the development of models for refining data to derive vital insights. Not only can alerts be raised if variables exceed certain set parameters, but batches can be compared to see how different each one is. This allows pharma entities to derive the extent of standardisation across batches, which is a critical aspect from a manufacturing perspective.

Other benefits accrued could be better inventory management and lower equipment downtime (due to proactive maintenance).

Quality
In the last few years, we have seen a spike in the frequency of inspections in the premises of various drug manufacturers. This has made companies invest in developing innovative practices that minimise human intervention at various production phases while logging critical data. With IoT, the industry can move away from archaic manual processes and data management techniques and be prepared for more stringent quality control frameworks deployed by regulators in India and abroad.

Transit management
In case of sensitive medicines and vaccines, it becomes essential to monitor the ambient temperature of a container carrying them. Sensors can offer real-time monitoring of cases and containers and report instances of unfavorable modification of ambient environment. Transmitted data logged can be analysed to gain all kinds of insights leading to safer transport of drugs.

Drug development
The pharma industry faces a challenge in making the drug development process more efficient. This means increasing productivity while keeping the costs under check. It also implies using relevant technologies to optimise the process. An IoT-enabled system in a clinical trial is a good way of addressing such requirements.

During a clinical trial, it is essential to maintain safety of subject while ensuring trial integrity. An IoT environment will help monitor patients more effectively, and use the data captured from the devices to highlight any adverse events or report positive effects. Thus, healthcare professionals can work with a system that promotes proactive management with insights throughout the healthcare chain.

Collaboration
The data made available through an IoT connected system can ensure greater collaboration within the pharma industry. Data could also be made available to regulators without having to browse through multiple logs maintained offline. Researchers and other stakeholders can work across data barriers or constraints imposed by geography or economic considerations.

Better patient outcomes
With reduced production and better transit management practices, pharma companies can offer vital drugs at reduced prices to customers. Patient feedback can also be managed better as also the supply-demand balance.

Beyond these immediate benefits, the pharma sector can also rely on IoT to gather insights across the value chain to streamline it. An investment in IoT opens the door for all stakeholders to benefit. From bringing drugs of higher quality into the market faster to ensuring safer transport of drugs and better feedback monitoring, IoT is turning into a vital ally for pharma companies.

world IOT conference Bangalore

 
 

DevOps Summit Pune

23 Aug

DevOps Summit

DevOps

The term “DevOps” typically refers to the emerging professional movement that advocates a collaborative working relationship between Development and IT Operations, resulting in the fast flow of planned work achieving the value stream that is between the business (where requirements are defined) and the customer (where value is delivered). It is a new way of looking at development altogether.

This conference “DevOps Summit” brings together leading practitioner-organisations who have achieved Continuous Delivery and organisational transformation. Companies going through Mergers and Acquisitions will inherit these systems too and be faced with similar situations and need to find out the many initiatives that increase the efficiency and agility within the enterprise and balance system uptime and stability while bringing alignment between Dev and Ops.

Learn more about DevOps skills, Delivering Processes, Tools for building and deployment, Legacy Challenges, Security Integration, Cross-team engagement and many more.

Pune DevOps Conference

InfoZen enables pre-deployment patching for DevOps coding

DevOps, a combination of the words ‘development’ and ‘operations’, has come to mean a lot of different things. It can describe a movement, a cultural shift, or any new practice that emphasizes the role of collaboration and communication between software developers and other IT professionals, such as the system administrators who will be overseeing the operations and security of the programs that developers create. In general, DevOps also includes automation as part of its deployment to help speed things along.

It was not surprising that DevOps scanning tools made Gartner’s list of hot cybersecurity product groups, because as DevOps continues to evolve, it has taken on a greater role in terms of security. Within cybersecurity, deploying DevOps generally involves fixing errors and vulnerabilities in a program’s code while it is still being written.

Writing code using a DevOps process is different. Following those wise old sayings like “measure twice, cut once,” or “a stitch in time saves nine,” writing code using DevOps means finding and fixing errors as the program is being created — long before the deployment phase. In an ideal world, the final code delivered to IT teams for deployment is, thus, free from errors or vulnerabilities.

But achieving that level of success, where the final code is both secure and error-free, is not an easy thing to achieve. While various tools exist to handle various parts of the DevOps chain, it normally requires an experienced integrator to link them together, add automation, and keep everything running smoothly over time. For this review, InfoZen was brought in to create a fully-end-to-end DevOps scanning solution using their InfoZen Cloud and DevOps Practice service. The company is currently offering the same type of services for several federal agencies.

SPONSORS
Benefits of sponsorship

This is a great opportunity to strategically brand your organization. As a sponsor, you will receive a tremendous amount of visibility and numerous other benefits at the conference.

Sponsorship Levels

Platinum Sponsor (Limited to 2)

Gold Sponsor (Limited to 3)

Knowledge Partner (Limited to 1)

Silver Sponsor (Limited to 4)

Bronze Sponsor (Limited to 4)

Conference Bag Sponsor (Limited to 1)

Track Sponsor (Limited to 2)

A-La-Carte (Open)
DevOps conference, Devops Event

 

How Any Company Can Save Money With the Internet of Things

19 Jul

You may think only giant corporations can benefit from the internet of things–the networking of nontechnical objects so they can receive and transmit data. But right now, businesses like yours are employing the IoT: digitizing work sites, office buildings, manufacturing facilities, and shipments. It’s easier than you might think.

IMCO General Construction, which employs 180 in Ferndale, Washington, faced typical challenges for building contractors: a dispersed work force; far-flung work sites; gathering data from complex construction projects. Then the company began working with Seattle-based startup Unearth, which networks remote sensors, drones, satellite data, and mobile devices to help construction firms reduce accidents and respond to problems quickly.
“If we’re flying [a drone] over a site and the owner can see on the live feed that they need something changed, we can react to it quickly,” says IMCO construction manager Casey Dougherty. “It’s definitely made our crews more efficient, which means more profitability.” The prices of Unearth’s services vary, but generally start at $1,000 per month.

Other companies are using IoT to cut costs. When Magnet 360–a 190-person firm that helps businesses use the Salesforce platform–moved into an office converted from an old warehouse in Minneapolis, the staff quickly realized their HVAC system needed an upgrade. Enter local IoT startup 75F, which uses sensors to analyze air flow, and automates heating and cooling functions; the costs for a 75F system range from 50¢ to $3.50 per square foot. By using 75F, companies can cut energy costs up to 70 percent, says its chief operating officer, Bob French.

The IoT helps with harder-to-define tasks, too. Family-owned Christensen Farms, a pork producer in Sleepy Eye, Minnesota, affixes wireless tracking devices called Bees, made by Santa Clara, California-based Roambee, to its livestock trailers. There, they track humidity levels inside the trucks, so drivers know if they need to adjust the ventilators. Brian Bourke, the VP of marketing for Seko Logistics in Chicago, says his company often places a Roambee device in sensitive shipments to provide an extra layer of assurance to key clients. “They can see where a package is at any point,” he says–which lets Seko staffers focus on more valuable tasks. Roambee’s devices, which may be stopped and started depending on seasonal need, and related hardware generally cost $1 to $1.50 per device per day of usage. Various payment options are available.

And Formlabs, a professional 3-D-printing company based in Somerville, Massachusetts, uses devices from nearby IoT startup Tulip to track the production of its customized sample parts, says chief product officer Dávid Lakatos. Formlabs’ custom Tulip setup has a monitor and interface at every major station on its shop floors; there they track and record key company processes. Formlabs has grown 100 percent each of the past two years, and with the training time it’s saving by pre­recording instructions for major tasks, chances are it will grow even more. Just like the IoT.

What’s trending

Augmented workers

Augmenting workers with smart glasses will be huge for certain heavy industries, says Dayna Grayson, a partner with New Enterprise Associates in Washington, D.C. Not only will they record what wearers are seeing, but in a manufacturing environment, a mechanic could receive diagnostic data from such eyewear. They might even summon experts for certain problems.

Digitized shop floors

Digitizing “the last mile of the Industrial Revolution,” like connecting machines to IoT applications, is starting to happen, says Grayson, who envisions improvements in maintenance, worker health and safety, and energy savings. By using sensors to monitor machinery, businesses could shift to repairing equipment as needed and move away from maintenance schedules.

Inventory control

“Retailers and other companies are using smart sensors to keep track of inventory and to automatically reorder when more products are needed,” says Victoria Petrock, a principal analyst with eMarketer.

Office atmosphere

Air-quality monitors for your workers’ desks are coming, says Jenny Fielding, managing director at Techstars, and soon we’ll tweak the room temperature according to what they find. One Bay Area startup, Awair, offers such monitors, as well as sensors that cover broader areas of entire buildings.

Smarter shipping

Using the IoT, carriers can relay location data and other information to clients; IoT tags could reduce the volume of lost packages and in-transit damage for temperature-controlled items.

Pleased pork

Agricultural uses for the IoT include sensors that monitor humidity levels in trucks transporting pigs, so drivers can adjust instantly if they need more ventilation.

Cost shaving

Companies using IoT sensors and systems to control heat and air conditioning usage in large facilities can save serious dollars.

 

Internet of Things Set to Shake up Corporate Security: Gartner

17 May
Gartner predicts that IoT (internet of things) security requirements will “reshape and expand” over half of all global enterprise IT security programmes by 2020.

IoT devices are smart and programmable devices that can be remotely controlled and linked to other devices, ranging from utility smart meters and kitchen fridges to vehicle telematics.

“The IoT is redrawing the lines of IT responsibilities for organisations,” said Earl Perkins, an analyst at Gartner. “IoT objects possess the ability to change the state of the environment around them, or even their own state. So securing the IoT expands the responsibility of the traditional IT security practice, as every new identifying, sensing and communicating device is added.”

Gartner says that although traditional IT infrastructure is capable of many IoT security tasks, it says functions that are delivered as purpose-built platforms using embedded technology, sensors and machine-to-machine (M2M) communications for specific business use, signal a change in the traditional concept of IT and the concept of securing IT.

Perkins said: “Real-time, event-driven applications and non-standard protocols will require changes to application testing, vulnerability assessments, identity and access management (IAM) and other areas.

“And handling network scale, data transfer methods and memory usage differences will also require changes. Governance, management and operations of security functions will need to change to accommodate expanded responsibilities,” said Perkins.

He said this was similar to the ways that bring your own device (BYOD), mobile and cloud computing have required changes – “but on a much larger scale and in greater breadth”, when it came to IoT.

Gartner says CISOs (certified information security officers) should not automatically assume that existing security technologies and services must be replaced when it comes to IoT. Instead, Gartner says they should evaluate the potential of integrating new security solutions with old ones.

Many traditional security product and service providers, said Gartner, are already expanding their existing portfolios to incorporate basic support for embedded systems and M2M communications, including support for communications protocols, application security and IAM requirements that are specific to the IoT.

“At this time, there is no ‘guide to securing the IoT’ available that provides CISOs with a framework for incorporating IoT principles across all industries and use cases,” said Perkins.

Gartner says CISOs should “start small” and develop initial security projects based on specific IoT interactions within specific business use cases. CISOs can then build on these use case experiences to develop common security deployment scenarios, core architectural foundations and competency centres for the future.

 

Source:  http://www.computerworld.in/news/internet-of-things-set-to-shake-up-corporate-security-says-gartner

 

Mahindra REVA Makes the Connected Car a Reality with M2M Connectivity from Vodafone

17 May
Since its foundation in 1994, electric automotive specialist Mahindra REVA – a part of the $15.9 billion Mahindra Group based in India – has grown to become a world leading pioneer in electric vehicle technologies and manufacturing. Recently the company was named by ‘Fast Company’ magazine as being in the Top 50 Most Innovative Companies in the world. Today the company licenses out its electric vehicle technologies, helps to develop zero-emissions mobility solutions and has a large deployed fleet of electric cars across 24 countries.

Enabling customer support for its electric vehicles spread over the world can be a costly and challenging task for a niche player in the automotive market. Telematics-enabled remote diagnostics promises to reduce the cost of fault-diagnostics, improve vehicle uptime for customers and also enable customers to ‘stay connected’ with the car, and through that with the OEM brand. Mahindra REVA has been developing its telematics platform with a strategic focus to address these needs.

“‘Connected Cars’ are at the frontier of innovation in the car industry – they bring automotive, infotainment and communication technologies together to provide a great new experience for customers,” says Gopal, General Manager – Mobility Solutions and Business Development for Mahindra REVA.

The Need

Having set out its strategy, there was still a lot of work for Mahindra REVA to do. Even in an era of ubiquitous communication, cars have so far remained relatively untouched by the rapid advancements in communication and information technologies. Delivering the data reliably, securely and with the desired performance over mobile networks under diverse conditions and also managing the connectivity of large numbers of vehicles as volumes grow required a partner with expertise in M2M communications.

“M2M is a really exciting area right now,” says Gopal. “It has the ability to transform cars into intelligent devices that exchange real-time information and open up a range of groundbreaking new services for customers – especially the ability to monitor and control the car functions remotely.”

So when Gopal and his team started their search for an M2M partner they had three main criteria. First, they wanted to find a company that understood the strategy and vision for M2M and the possibilities that it can open up.

Second, they wanted to make sure that the partner could provide reliable connections across India. “There is little point introducing this kind of concept if it’s going to be let down by connectivity,” says Gopal.

Last, they also preferred a M2M partner with a global footprint to ease the launch of the car in other international markets.

The Solution

After researching the market, Mahindra REVA quickly realised that Vodafone would be the perfect partner for its new venture. According to Gopal, it was an easy decision to make. “Vodafone was the only network provider we spoke to that demonstrated that it had a long term vision and roadmap for M2M,” he confirms. “Vodafone has its own dedicated M2M service platform in India – something which is unique – and because Vodafone is such a strong global operator we could also see that we were going to get both the domestic and international network coverage that we wanted.”

After this selection process Vodafone advanced the project almost from its outset.

“We started working with Vodafone in 2011, two years before the official launch of the car,” Gopal explains. “Vodafone supplied us with the connections we needed for our tests, effectively linking the cars to a range of applications that we were in the process of developing.”

At this point, there was a big impetus to find out whether the service was going to be robust and reliable.

“We worked very closely with Vodafone throughout the development period, particularly when it came to testing the connectivity and the overall performance of the network,” says Gopal. “For example, we had some initial issues with connections in a factory in a remote area. Because Vodafone owns its own network, and has its own in-house team of M2M specialists, the problem was fixed straight away.

“Overall it was a great example of collaborative working between two companies with a similar vision of global innovation,” Gopal continues. “Indeed, this is the first and only project of its kind in India where a telecom service provider and an automotive manufacturer have joined hands to bring a major advance in technology to market.”

The Impact

Mahindra REVA’s connected car – the Mahindra e2o – first launched in India in March 2013. There are already 350 e2o’s on the road, all connected to a range of applications and services via the Vodafone network. This means owners are able to access various features and functions of their vehicle remotely using a smartphone app or from a dedicated webpage. By doing so they can check the state of charge in the battery of their car, control its air-conditioning, lock or unlock doors, find the nearest charging station and more. The e2o also provides the owner with automatic SMS text alerts on a variety of safety and security checks, such as a door left unlocked, or a parking brake not applied.

In addition, Mahindra REVA’s service team is also using the remote connectivity to track potential maintenance issues in real time and proactively warn drivers when they may need to book in for repairs or a service.

According to Gopal, this is all part of a package that is really pleasing customers. “The reaction we’ve had from people that have bought or driven the vehicles so far has been very positive,” says Gopal. “Many of the features we have introduced are ‘firsts’ for the Indian market – such as the remote diagnostics and a charging station locator. They are proving to be a real hit with technology-savvy customers that want their car to fit with their connected and busy lifestyle.”

Looking to the Future

Over the next few years Mahindra REVA forecasts that sales of the e2o will reach over 30,000. In fact it has built a new factory in Bangalore that’s capable of producing 30,000 of the cars a year.

This faith in the e2o’s future is partly because of the success of the initial launch in India, but also because the company sees great potential for expansion overseas.

“We’ve already had great success over the past decade, particularly in places like Europe where there is a very strong demand for solutions that address carbon emissions and the need for greener cities,” says Gopal. ”With this product we now have the potential to penetrate even further, offering customers the zero-emission solutions they crave, but with a lot of added features that completely revolutionise the driver experience.”

According to Gopal, this plan for international expansion is just one more reason why Mahindra REVA’s partnership with Vodafone is proving to be such a continuing strategic success.

“We knew from the outset that this was going to be a global product, so we needed a global partner that would help us to get this right,” Gopal says. “With Vodafone we can roll out this service to other territories using one network, one management platform and one provider. It gives us every confidence for the future, and helps us to keep one step ahead of our competitors.”

Source : http://www.connectedenterprise.in/case-study/mahindra-reva-makes-connected-car-reality-m2m-connectivity-vodafone#front

 

The Internet of Things: Coming to a Network Near You

17 May
When people talk about the Internet of Things (IoT), the most common examples are smart cars, IP-addressable washing machines and Internet-connected refrigerators. But IoT is coming to the enterprise as well, and CIOs should already be thinking about the ways it will shake up the corporate network.“Products and services which were previously outside their (CIOs’) domain will increasingly be under their jurisdiction,” says Daniel Castro, senior analyst with the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation (ITIF), a US-based research and educational institute.

So, what are these devices?

Castro says that companies increasingly will be operating in “smart buildings” with advanced HVAC systems that are connected to the rest of the corporate network.

Many utility companies will be deploying Web-connected smart meters at customers’ facilities to allow for remote monitoring.

Companies are tying their physical security to their network security, so that data from security cameras and authentication readers are coming under the purview of enterprise IT. Most of the retailers already use RFID and other tracking technologies to manage supply chain logistics, says IDC’s Michael Fauscette. IoT is therefore a natural next step.

Then there’s operational technology (OT), where enterprise assets such as manufacturing equipment, fleet trucks, rail cars, even patient monitoring equipment in hospitals become networked devices, says Hung LeHong, research vice president at Gartner.

“Those types of assets are becoming Internet-enabled,” LeHong says. And even though they are managed by field operations or hospital services, they could become end-points on the corporate network.

Other examples of OT might include companies deploying vending machines that are connected to the Internet, so that they can be automatically restocked when certain items run low.

Another key area where IoT is making an appearance is what Gartner calls the digital supply chain. That’s when a company’s end-products, such as consumer electronics or large machinery, are Internet-enabled so that the manufacturer can keep track of maintenance schedules and other such aspects.
Besides, IoT is also showing up in consumer offerings such as home automation and smart grid. IT executives in industries such as gas and electric utilities will need to stay abreast of developments such as how smart meters and other types of data-generating solutions will affect IT and the corporate network.

And finally, IoT is emerging in so-called smart cities, where all kinds of devices and assets such as traffic lights, parking meters and garbage truck fleets are gradually being connected to the Internet. Municipal government IT executives will need to be aware of how these assets tie in to the network.

IT and OT Convergence

What will likely happen is a convergence of OT and IT. “As these machines go onto the corporate network, CIOs need to start talking together about what the future will look like when traditional IT and OT overlap on the network,” LeHong says.

“Who is responsible for providing security, for example,” LeHong asks. “There are existing IT skill sets that are very developed, but are at the same time, new or not a prime focus for the operations guy. There can be some synergies.”

IT executives will need to prepare themselves for situations such as when an IP-based vending machine is creating software replenishment orders for out-of-stock items using an ERP application, he believes.

“When it creates the replenishment order, does the vending machine need a user license for the ERP application?” LeHong asks. “CIOs need to get an understanding of this. Even if they are not going to own the vending machines, they need to worry about things like these. That’s what we mean by convergence. OT and IT need to discuss things like governance, security, software licensing and maintenance.”

In terms of networking technology and strategies at enterprises, IoT will have a significant impact. According to a report on IoT trends published by Gartner in 2012, things will be connected, but not necessarily in the ways most familiar to companies today. “Wi-Fi, 3G/4G cellular and Bluetooth are the wireless connectivity technologies we are most familiar with. However, they will not be the only way things connect to the Internet,” the report says.

These network technologies and protocols consume lots of power and are designed for higher-bandwidth applications, the firm says, but many things (for example, a temperature/humidity sensor in a remote agricultural setting) will require low bandwidth, long range and very low power consumption.

Looking ahead to the next few years, growth of the IoT will probably be greatest in areas such as inventory tracking and supply chain management, says Castro from ITIF. But given the way technology is developing, it’s likely that the IoT will be pervasive in many aspects of business.

Source:  http://www.connectedenterprise.in/feature/internet-things-coming-network-near-you#front

 

 

The ABCs of the Internet of Things

17 May
You’ve heard the term and probably read stories about smart homes where the toaster talks to the smoke detector. But what makes it all connect? When will it become mainstream, and will it work? These frequently asked questions help explain it all.

What is the Internet of Things?

There is no agreed-upon definition, but there is a test for determining whether something is part of the IoT: Does one vendor’s product work with another’s? Does a door lock by one vendor communicate with a light switch by another vendor, and do you want the thermostat to be part of the conversation?

Here’s the scenario: As you approach the front door of your house, a remote control built into your key unlocks the door. The door’s wireless radio messages the network, which prompts the hall light to turn on. The house thermostat, which was lowered after you left for work, returns to a comfort zone. Everything is acting in concert, which brings us to the elegant definition of IoT by Paul Williamson, director of low power wireless for semiconductor maker CSR: “A true Internet of Things is coordination between multiple devices.”

What makes the Internet of Things almost human?

In a word: Sensors. Many IoT devices have sensors that can register changes in temperature, light, pressure, sound and motion. They are your eyes and ears to what’s going on the world. Before we talk about what they do, let’s describe them. These sensors are part of a device category called a microelectromechanical system (MEMS) and are manufactured in much the same way microprocessors are manufactured, through a lithography process. These sensors can be paired with an application-specific integrated circuit or an ASIC. This is a circuit with a limited degree of programming capability and is hardwired to do something specific. It can also be paired with microprocessor and will likely be attached to a wireless radio for communications.

Can you give an example of how IoT sensors work?

Here’s the scene: You are away on vacation and the house is empty. A moisture sensor detects water on the basement floor. That sensor finding is processed by an app, which has received another report from a temperature sensor that detects the flow of water in the main water pipe. (When water flows, it takes away heat and lowers the temperature).

That both sensors are detecting anomalies is cause for concern. A high rate of flowing water may signal a burst pipe, triggering an automated valve shutoff; a slight water flow might be a running toilet, and the water on the basement floor by routine leakage from a heavy rain. In either case, you get a machine-generated message describing the findings.

Here’s how you investigate. Via a mobile app, you get two one-time codes to unlock your front door, one for your neighbor and another for a plumber. When the door is unlocked, a text alert tells you who entered. Having knowledge of the condition of your home may be a big driver of IoT adoption.

How will IoT sensors work in public spaces?

Take parking. Cities are embedding sensors in on-street parking spaces from a company called Streetline that can detect if a car is parked in one. Drivers looking for a parking space use the company’s mobile app, which lets them know when a space becomes available. Streetline has also added sound level and surface temperature sensors to help cities determine the best times to apply salt and use noise sensors to ensure compliance with ordinances.

In the public arena, a smartphone can double as a sensor. In Boston, as people drive down a road, the phone’s accelerometer sensor will keep track of bumps. An accelerometer can tell up from down, but more precisely it measures acceleration. All it took to turn a smartphone into a road condition monitoring tool, was an app that used its existing sensor in a new way.

Do you want your bathroom scale to talk to your refrigerator?

The IoT opens up a lot of opportunity for creative app writers. Let’s start with a smart refrigerator. You buy your groceries online and have them delivered to your home. It has now become advantageous for grocers and food product makers to add RFID tags to their products. The refrigerator knows what is inside via weight-sensitive shelves and expiration dates. It can also help you keep a grocery list, automate orders and provide nutritional information.

For instance, let’s say you decide to take a pint of Ben and Jerry’s ice cream out of the freezer. When that happens, a connected wireless speaker announces, loudly: “Please reconsider this selection. As requested, here is your most recent weight and BMI.” The wireless speaker is reporting data collected from your bathroom scale. The scale was never designed to communicate with a refrigerator, but an app writer made it so by linking data from the scale and fridge. This scale-fridge-speaker combination may seem silly, but here’s the point: In the IoT, app writers now have the ability to connect seemingly disparate things to create new types of functionality.

How do IoT devices communicate?

An IoT device will have a radio that can send and receive wireless communications. IoT wireless protocols are designed to accomplish some basic services: Operate on low power, use low bandwidth and work on a mesh network. Some work on the 2.4 GHz band, which is also used by Wi-Fi and Bluetooth, and the sub-GHz range. The sub-GHz frequencies, including 868 and 915 MHz bands, may have the advantage of less interference.

Why is low power and low bandwidth important in IoT?

Some IoT devices will get power from electrical systems, but many, such as door locks and standalone sensors, will use batteries. These devices send and receive small amounts of information intermittently or periodically. Consequently, the battery life of an IoT device can range from 1.5 years to a decade, if the battery lasts that long. One IoT maker, Insteon, uses both radio and powerline communication, which can send data over existing electrical wiring as well as via a radio, which it says will offer an increased measure of reliability.

What is a mesh network?

Devices in a mesh network connect directly with one another, and pass signals like runners in a relay race. It is the opposite of a centralized network. The transmission range of an IoT device on a mesh network is anywhere from 30 feet to more than 300 feet.

Since mesh network devices can hand-off signals, they have an ability to connect thousands of sensors over a wide area, such as a city, and operate in concert. Mesh networks have the added ability of working around the failure of any individual device. Wireless mesh IoT protocols include the Z-Wave Alliance, the Zigbee Alliance, and Insteon, which also has an alliance of vendors. These protocols aren’t directly interoperable, although there are workarounds via hubs (more on this later).

ZigBee is an open protocol, but its critics say that not all of its implementations are necessarily the same. ZigBee runs a certification to ensure standard deployments. Insteon and Z-Wave are proprietary, which may ensure standardization of implementation.

What’s the best wireless network for the IoT?

Today, no wireless technology has a dominant market share in IoT applications. Nick Jones, an analyst at research firm Gartner, said more than 10 IoT wireless technologies will “get significant traction” in IoT applications. These wireless technologies include cellular, satellites and new communications such as Weightless, which uses “white space,” or unoccupied TV channels. More importantly, no one wireless technology will meet every need and circumstance. A connected car, for instance, will use a cellular network to contact your home network.

Will I need a gateway or hub in the IoT?

A gateway, bridge or hub provides a connection point between your home network and other devices. The hub works with your home router and provides communications to the machines, devices and sensors that are part of your IoT universe. You will want, by default, your Zigbee smart meter to communicate with your Z-Wave or Insteon thermostat. This will also be true for the washing machine that is connected to a smart metering system and starts a wash only when electric rates are at their lowest point. These connections will be established through hubs that support multiple wireless technologies.

SmartThings, for instance, makes a hub that supports both Zigbee and Z-Wave, as well as a platform to build connecting applications. Eventually, these wireless technologies may be included in home routers, set-top boxes from your cable companies, or even devices such as a Google Chromecast.

Won’t Bluetooth win in the end?

Bluetooth Low Energy was originally aimed at wearable technology, not the broad IoT market. But in early 2014, CSR, a semiconductor maker, announced a mesh network for Bluetooth, meaning it could now connect to thousands of things.

Bluetooth’s ubiquity in mobile devices means that a Bluetooth mesh network as a broad IoT platform will have some advantages. Because Bluetooth is already a feature on smartphones, a smartphone could act as a management hub inside a home. But it’s not perfect. A hub will be needed if someone wants to connect with the home network remotely, such as from work.

Do the big consumer product vendors really want an Internet of Things?

Skeptics say it’s unlikely that all the big vendors will embrace open standards. A more likely outcome for the IoT are technological islands defined by proprietary data interchanges.

Without open standards or open communication protocols, devices on the network won’t be able to share data and work in concert. Will Apple develop products that can connect with Samsung products? Will Bosch products communicate with those from Samsung or Sears? Maybe not.

Consumers will be frustrated and will be told that they need to buy into a particular vendor’s product partner network to get a full IoT experience.

Can open source force the big vendors to play nice?

Open source advocates are hoping they can avert a fracturing of the IoT. The Linux Foundation, a nonprofit consortium, created the AllSeen Aliance and released a code stack in late 2013 that can be used by any electronics or appliance maker to connect to another product. The alliance hopes that the sheer weight of adoption of this stack, called AllJoyn, will help to push the IoT toward open standards. AllJoyn is agnostic about wireless protocols, and support for Bluetooth LE, ZigBee and Z-Wave can be added easily by the community.

Will the IoT destroy what little privacy you have left?

Privacy advocates are plenty worried about the IoT’s impact on consumers. Part of this is due to the arrival of IPv6 addresses, the next generation Internet protocol. It replaces IPv4, which assigned 32-bit addresses, with a total limit of 4.3 billion; IPv6 is 128-bit, and allows for 340 trillion trillion trillion addresses or 340,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000. This makes it possible to assign a unique identifier to anything that’s part of the IoT (although not everything needs to be IP addressable, such as light switches). This may enable deep insights into a home. Smart metering systems, for instance, will be able to track individual appliance use.

“Information about a power consumer’s schedule can reveal intimate, personal details about their lives, such as their medical needs, interactions with others, and personal habits,” warned the Electronic Privacy Information Center, in testimony in late 2013 at a Federal Trade Commission workshop. This is information that may be shared with third parties. At this same FTC workshop, another leading privacy group, the Center for Democracy and Technology, outlined its nightmare scenario.

Light sensors in a home can tell how often certain rooms are occupied, and temperature sensors may be able to tell when one bathes, exercises or leaves the house; microphones can easily pick up the content of conversations. The message is clear: Courts, regulators and lawmakers will be fighting over IoT privacy safeguards for years to come.

Will my smart washer attack me?

Security experts are worried that consumers won’t be able to tell the difference between secure and insecure devices on their home network. It will be a threat to enterprise networks as well. These devices, many of which will be cheap and junky and made by who-knows-who overseas, may not have any security of their own.

Security researchers imagine problems, such as the connected toilet, demonstrated at a recent Black Hat conference, which flushed and closed its lid repeatedly. Hackers could create havoc by turning appliances and HVAC systems on and off. Baby monitors have been successfully taken over by outsiders. One advantage that IoT security may have is it’s still in its early stages, and the security community has a chance to build IoT systems with a strong measure of protection. Cisco is fishing around for ideas. The company is running a contest (with a June 17 submission deadline) with $300,000 in prize money for ideas for securing the IoT.

When will the Internet of Things be ready for prime time?

Vendors will be sorting out the various protocols and technologies for years. Consumers are curious, perhaps, but sensors and hubs for the home aren’t flying off the shelves. There are real IoT uses today, especially for home monitoring and security. For now, the big users of sensor networks and remote intelligence gathering are businesses and governments.

Governments are deploying sensors to alert them to failed street lights, leaks in water systems and full trash cans. Sensors will likely have a major role in traffic control, forest fire and landslide detection. Remote sensing is already mainstream in many industries, office buildings and in the energy supply.

It’s the consumer applications that get the most attention because they involve almost every industry and platform: health systems, home energy use, hardware, home building, electronics and the entire category of wearables, including clothing. Even plumbers will have to be aware of the IoT because of connected shut-off valves. But no one is going to stand in line for the latest smart refrigerator. It isn’t the next iPad. The IoT rollout will be slow and will occur over many years, as appliances are replaced and home electrical systems are upgraded with smart devices.

What’s the worst case scenario?

That a true coordination between multiple devices never comes to pass. Vendors, initially, will build islands, closed IoT environments that only work with their products and those made by selected partners. Privacy protections may be treated loosely, with users forced to opt out if they don’t want their home turned into a giant spy cam for marketers.

We haven’t even mentioned things like Google Glass. Imagine a scenario where people agree to share live streams as part of a Neighborhood Block Watch. A surveillance state may arrive on a flood of good intentions. But the IoT has potential to make life more efficient, safer, healthier and environmentally friendly.

In particular, people who install solar energy systems and use net metering, essentially selling surplus energy back to the utility, will have powerful reasons to install aware and connected systems. But whether these systems can work together will depend on the willingness of vendors to make their products connectable. There is no vendor large enough to control the IoT, but there are vendors large enough to make a mess of it.

 

Source : http://www.computerworld.in/feature/the-abcs-of-the-internet-of-things7